Frequently Asked Questions

Are they turned on properly or is the battery dead?

  1. Check to make sure your hearing aids are on by touching the top of the hearing aid and listening for a scratchy sound.
  2. If your hearing aid uses batteries, try replacing them. Make sure to pull the sticker off the battery and insert it properly. Fun fact: hearing aid batteries are powered by oxidizing zinc with oxygen from the air, so let it “breath” for 2 minutes to improve performance. Then, make sure your battery door is completely closed.
  3. If you have rechargeable devices, check the charge on the charging case or the smartphone app. When you charge, make sure your hearing aids are securely in the dock and the light is on.

Is the volume at the appropriate level?

  1. Try resetting your devices. For rechargeable devices, place them in the charger for a minute. For battery-operated devices, open the battery door and then close it.
  2. Also check and adjust your hearing aids’ volume using the smartphone app. If you need help, please check out this article: "How to Connect Your Hearing Aids to Your Smartphone."

Are they dirty or clogged?

  1. Try cleaning your devices with the cleaning tools that came with your devices. Brush off the microphone and remove ear wax or other debris.
  2. Then replace your wax filters or guards and the domes, even if they were recently changed.
  3. Also consider a professional cleaning, which you should do once or twice a year.
  4. For more information, check out this article to learn "How to Keep Your Hearing Aids in Tip-Top Shape."

If these tips don’t solve your problem, please call us at 888-780-3450 so we can find a solution for you. To help troubleshoot, we’ll want to know:

  1. How long have you had these hearing aids? How often are you wearing them?
  2. Are both hearing aids affected or just one? If so, which one?
  3. Did something happen recently that could have caused this? For example, did they get wet, get stepped on, or get chewed up by the dog?
  4. Does the device fade in or out? Or does it sound like it’s losing its connection? Or only work occasionally? Sometimes this can happen when you get sweaty or are in extremely humid environments.

If you’ve ever heard yourself in a telephone message or on a home movie, you probably felt like you sounded much different in the recording than you do in real life. One of the reasons your voice sounds richer when you speak (vs. hearing it through a device) is bone conduction. Your vocal cords create vibrations in your skull that make your voice sound lower and richer than it actually is. To learn more about this topic, check out this article, "Getting Used to the Sound of Your Own Voice With Hearing Aids."

If you just started wearing new hearing aids or you wear them infrequently, the best thing you can do is to wear them consistently every day for at least one month. To find out why, we recommend reading the article, "Why Slow and Steady Wins the Race With New Hearing Aids." Your brain needs to adjust to hearing with them. Within a week, it’ll determine this as the new normal and you won’t notice it anymore. If you’d like to speed up the process, one proven technique is to read aloud.

If you’re wearing your hearing aids consistently every day and you continue to have trouble, please give us a call at 888-780-3450 so we can find a solution for you.

Have you been wearing your hearing aids less than 15 days?

Surprisingly, people with hearing loss are often sensitive to sounds and it’s very normal for this to continue when you first start wearing new hearing aids. Your brain has been missing certain sounds for a while and it must relearn how to hear again. This adjustment period usually takes about 30 days. Experts recommend to start slowly and gradually build up to wearing your devices all day. For example, in the first couple days, it’s recommended to wear your hearing aids in quieter places, like your home, for 2-4 hours a day. By the end of the first week, aim to be at about 4-6 hours a day. The more times you experience sounds with your new hearing aids, the less alerting it will be. Learn more about it in the article, "Why Slow and Steady Wins the Race With New Hearing Aids."

Are your hearing aids too loud all of the time?

If you’ve been wearing your hearing aids less than 15 days, please see above.

If not, consider adjusting the volume to a level that is more comfortable for you. The process is pretty straightforward with your hearing aids’ smartphone app, but if you need assistance we’re happy to help you. If you haven’t already downloaded your hearing aids’ smartphone app, here’s a helpful article, "How to Connect Your Hearing Aids to Your Smartphone."

If you’ve tried adjusting the volume and the loudness is preventing you from wearing your hearing aids, we’ll want to connect you with one of our experts to help diagnose the issue. Please call us at 888-780-3450 so we can find a solution for you.

Are your hearing aids too loud only in certain situations or are certain sounds too loud?

If you’ve been wearing your hearing aids less than 15 days, please see above.

If you’ve had them longer than 15 days, it’s important to know that most volume issues aren’t due to the actual devices, but how we personalize your hearing aid programs based on your feedback. Your audiogram provides the amplification you require at different frequencies, but how you experience certain sounds is very personal.

Therefore, we need to know what you like or don’t like in order to “fine-tune” your hearing aids. It’s a good idea to keep some notes in a little notebook or on your phone. Since your hearing memory is short-term, it’s important to be as descriptive as possible on the sound, the setting you were using, and the environment you were in. The more information you can provide our hearing care professional, the better they can fine-tune your hearing aids to your liking.

Then, please call us at 888-780-3450, so we can connect you with one of our experts and find a solution for you.

One of the most frequent comments we hear in the beginning is that sounds are tinny, which is due to high-pitch amplification. The higher pitches are typically the sounds you’ve been missing the longest and are also the sounds that are the most alerting. But these are also the sounds responsible for about two-thirds of speech understanding. So while these high-pitched sounds might be a bit abrasive now, they will ultimately give you the speech clarity and understanding you need from your hearing aids.

Imagine you’re sitting in a dark room and someone suddenly flipped on the light. Your initial reaction is to turn it off because it seems much too bright. However, we all know that our eyes quickly adjust to the light. Your ears have been missing high pitch sounds for a long time, oftentimes at least 5-7 years. Just like the bright light, they’re suddenly being exposed to sounds again, which takes some adjusting. But with consistent wear, your brain will learn to hear these sounds again and after the first month, you won’t even pay attention to the tinny sound.

Learn more about adjusting to your new hearing aids in the article, "Why Slow and Steady Wins the Race With New Hearing Aids."

After the first 30 days, if you’re continuing to experience tinny, high-pitched, or harsh sounds, it’s important to know that adjustments can be made based on your feedback. Your audiogram provides the amplification you require at different frequencies, but how you experience certain sounds is very personal. By knowing what you like or don’t like, your hearing aids can be “fine-tuned.” It’s a good idea to keep some notes in a little notebook or on your phone. Since your hearing memory is short-term, it’s important to be as descriptive as possible on the sound, the setting you were using, and the environment you were in. The more information you can provide our hearing care professional, the better they can fine-tune your hearing aids to your liking. Then please call us at 888-780-3450, so we can connect you with one of our experts to find a solution for you.

When you start wearing new hearing aids, it’s normal to have a tickling or itching sensation. Your ear canals are very sensitive, so your devices can produce a feeling similar to a feather touching your skin. Like many new sensations, the tickling or itching feeling is only temporary and your body will get used to it as you wear them consistently. It’s important to wear them every day, but stick to the recommended wearing schedule to avoid overdoing it. Start by wearing them for a couple hours a day and gradually increase your wearing time until you’re able to wear them all day by the end of your first month. Learn more about it in the article, "Why Slow and Steady Wins the Race With New Hearing Aids."

If your ears are very dry or the itching continues, try to use a moisturizer, lubricant or anti-itch cream at the opening of your ear canal at night before bed. Make sure to wipe out the ear canal the next morning before inserting your hearing aids. For additional information or tips, check out the article, "Itchy Ears and New Hearing Aids."

If you continue to have problems with itching or your ears are draining, swollen or have an odor, please call us at 888-780-3450 so we can find a solution for you. We can connect you with one of our experts to address the issue which may be unrelated to your hearing aids like an ear infection, allergies, or swimmers ear.

Does this occur when you are talking?

One of the reasons it sounds like your ears are clogged or it feels like your head is in a barrel when you speak is due to bone conduction. Your vocal cords create vibrations in your skull that make your voice sound lower and richer than it actually is. Because the device is physically in your ear, sometimes it creates the effect of being “bottled up.” In the majority of cases, it’s just a matter of time before your brain will adjust and you’ll forget about it. If you just started wearing new hearing aids or you wear them infrequently, the best thing you can do is to wear them consistently every day. Within a week, your brain will determine this as the new normal and you’ll no longer notice it. To learn more about this topic, check out this article, "Getting Used to the Sound of Your Own Voice With Hearing Aids."

For a small number of people, this effect happens because the hearing aids are too snug and act like a plug. Your degree of hearing loss may require some closing of the ear canals to achieve optimal hearing.

So if you’re wearing your hearing aids consistently every day and you continue to have trouble, please give us a call at 888-780-3450 so we can find a solution for you.

Does this occur when you are not talking?

Prior to getting hearing aids, you typically don’t have something in your ears for hours at a time, every day. This is a very normal experience and takes some time to adjust to the sensation of having hearing aids in your ears. To learn more about the adjustment process, please read this article, "Why Slow and Steady Wins the Race With New Hearing Aids." Your level of hearing loss can impact how closed off your ear canals will need to be by the hearing aids to achieve the amount of amplification required. Because you have something physically blocking the opening of the ear canal, it’s common to feel like your ears are “bottled up.” You may notice that you hear yourself breathing more loudly or that your footsteps feel heavier when you walk across the floor.

Simply wearing your devices daily will typically solve this issue. However, if this sensation persists, sometimes it can be alleviated by changing the physical fit of the device or adjusting your settings. Please call us at 888-780-3450 so we can connect you with one of our experts and find a solution for you.

For the best performance and comfort, your hearing aids must be properly inserted in and/or around your ear. Putting on your hearing aid correctly every time takes practice. Oftentimes, the reason devices fall or slip out of the ear can be easily fixed with some simple tips.

For behind-the-ear hearing aids:

  1. Make sure you’re inserting your hearing aids into the correct ear. The right hearing aid will have red markings. The left hearing aid will have blue markings.
  2. Next, place the hearing aid behind your ear.
  3. Then, hold the end of the end of the tube between your thumb and index finger, and point the earpiece toward your ear canal opening.
  4. Finally, gently push the earpiece into your ear canal until the thin tube sits close against the side of your head.

For in-the-ear hearing aids:

  1. Make sure you’re inserting your hearing aids into the correct ear. The right hearing aid will have red markings. The left hearing aid will have blue markings.
  2. Next, hold the hearing aid with the vent or removal cord facing down and place the tip of the hearing aid in your ear canal.
  3. Gently pull your ear outwards and push the hearing aid into the ear canal, ensuring that it is positioned correctly. In the beginning, use a mirror to check.

If your devices continue to fall or slip out, please give us a call at 888-780-3450 so we can connect you with one of our experts and find a solution for you.

First, make sure your hearing aids are properly turned on, the battery is charged, the volume is at the appropriate level, and properly cleaned. If you’re not sure, please click here to see, "My hearing aids don’t work."

If everything checks out, it’s common to feel like you’re hearing better but that you expected to hear more. Perhaps you’re not hearing significantly better in places with background noise or in places that you were struggling in before your hearing aids.

One of the amazing features of today’s technology is that your devices can be adjusted to closely meet your expectations. Our experts can easily adjust your settings to give you the benefit you need. Oftentimes, new devices are set below your optimal settings because many people have a difficult time adjusting to the heightened sounds with their hearing aids. You may be someone who adapts to things more easily and you may be able to increase your settings faster. But it’s critical to wear your hearing aids consistently so your brain will start to integrate the sound better and the benefit of your devices will be more apparent. The longer you wear your devices the more likely you are going to want to increase the sound.

Utilizing the remote app through your smartphone to adjust your settings or volume will also help you have more control of how you hear. Check out this article if you need to learn "How to Connect Your Hearing Aids to Your Smartphone."

Routine cleaning is also critical for consistent sound. Make sure you know "How to Keep Your Hearing Aids in Tip-Top Shape" so you don’t have any lapse in performance.

If places with lots of background noise are a problem, you’re not alone (and even people with great hearing struggle in these situations). Click here to learn "How to Hear Your Best in Challenging Situations." Consistently wearing your hearing aids is key to optimal hearing in these situations. If you’ve been wearing your hearing aids less than 30 days or only wear them occasionally, then your brain will have a difficult time integrating the sound in a way that allows you to hear well with lots of background noise. But advanced settings and additional adjustments can be made to improve your experience in noisy environments, like restaurants or larger social gatherings. If you’d like, please call us at 888-780-3450 so we can connect you with one of our experts and find a solution for you.

As long as you’re within the 45-day trial, the process is very simple.

  1. Please call 888-780-3450 to let us know you'd like to return your devices. Then we can determine the best way for you to send them back before the end of the 45-day trial.
  2. After we confirm the devices have been returned, we’ll process it within 5 business days.

    a. If you paid with a credit card, your refund will show on your card 2-3 business days after we process it.

    b. If you made payments through our financing partner, you’ll receive a check from them within 4-5 weeks.

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