Hearing aid batteries

Find the right batteries now

Hearing aids are small high-performance computers, part of the progressive technology field.
The usual choice for hearing aid batteries are the button cell batteries, a type of micro batteries. As the name might suggest, the small, round, and flat shape resembles a customary button. Whereas in the past mercury and zinc batteries were primarily used, today it is zinc-air-systems that are most popular, characterized by a longer service life.
Hearing aid batteries are mainly offered in four different sizes: 10, 312, 13, and 675. Hereby, the basic rule of thumb applies: The bigger the battery, the more energy it can supply. Predetermining factors in choosing the right battery for your device are energy requirements and the design of the respective hearing aid.

How do hearing aid batteries work?

Zinc-air-systems function according to a simple basic principle: Air penetrates into the casing through perforations on the battery surface and reacts with the contained zinc to produce zinc oxide. The result of this chemical reaction is energy, accounting for the necessary current supply. In order for this reaction to occur only when the hearing aid batteries are in use, the perforations are factory-sealed with a colorful protective film.

This prevents air from entering through the perforations and reacting with the zinc. After removing the film and inserting the batteries into the hearing aid, there can be a delay depending on the particular battery used, until energy supply is ensured. Once the film is removed, even repositioning cannot prevent the normal self-discharge. Hence, it is recommended to activate the hearing aid battery only when it is actually supposed to be used.

How to change my hearing aid batteries?

Follow these steps to change your hearing aid battery:

  1. Open the battery door of the hearing aid.
  2. Use the magnetic brush to take out the old battery.
  3. If you don't have a magnetic brush, you may use anything pointy and push the battery from the back of the battery door.
  4. Take out the new battery from the battery strips.
  5. Turn the battery door strips back, and pull the quality guarantee area downwards, and grab the battery.
  6. The sticker on the battery indicates the positive side of the battery.
  7. Use the sticker as a point marker, put the battery inside the battery door of the hearing aid.
  8. The sticker should be pointing upwards.
  9. Pull the battery sticker off.
  10. Close the battery door.
  11. Listen through the hearing aid receiver, as the hearing aid will play a sound after the battery is changed. If there is no sound or the hearing aid is not turning on, try opening and closing the battery door.
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Which batteries are compatible with my hearing aid?

Not every battery matches any given hearing aid. Size is the key. Some devices can only be operated with type 10 hearing aid batteries, others exclusively with type 675 batteries. In the United States, the most commonly sold type is type 13, primarily used in behind-the-ear devices (BTE). The various types of hearing aid batteries can be very easily determined according to the standardized color scheme of their protective film: yellow, brown, orange and blue (in order of increasing battery size). With daily use of the device, the batteries have an average service life of five days up to three weeks, depending on wearing time and inherent energy capacities.

The alternative to hearing aid batteries: the accumulator

Just as with other electronic devices powered with batteries, hearing aid users can resort to an accumulator to supply energy to their hearing aids. The great advantage of this integrated rechargeable battery system is that batteries will no longer have to be replaced. Replacing hearing aid batteries does no longer apply. Even for a hearing aid that does not include an integrated accumulator, rechargeable batteries can be an option. Accumulators for hearing aids the size of customary button cells are available. A manufacturer-supplied version or a universal charging station is used for the charging process. If you are interested in a hearing aid with an integrated accumulator, our experts will gladly assist you over the telephone.

Correct storage of hearing aid batteries is important

When batteries are not being used, they should be stored in a place that is not too cool and not too warm. Storage at room temperature is ideal in order to ensure the longest possible energy potential. Moreover, special care should be taken in avoiding damage to the protective film, as otherwise air can penetrate and initiate the chemical processes leading to the discharge of the hearing aid batteries.

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